The edmodo FAQ


Please keep entries short - longer stories can be written in separate pages and linked. This FAQ should address the most commonly asked questions by people new to edmodo.

What is edmodo?
Why edmodo?
Why don't we use <insert favorite blog service> instead?
Why don't we use moodle instead?
Is edmodo safe for school use?
How much does it cost?
Won't the students go crazy with it?
What will parents think?
Isn't this more work for teachers?
Is this fair for students who don't have computers at home?


What is edmodo?

As described on the edmodo website www.edmodo.com :
Edmodo is a free and secure social learning network for teachers, students and schools. Edmodo provides classrooms a safe and easy way to connect and collaborate, offering a real-time platform to exchange ideas, share content, and access homework, grades and school notices
The edmodo application is an online service : if you are reading this document now, you are ready to use edmodo. So to access edmodo, students and teacher need only a computer, a browser (Internet Explorer, Mozilla, Chrome, Safari) and an internet connection. There are also iPhone and Android phone apps for edmodo.

Why edmodo?

Perhaps the best and shortest reason is that students love using it. Equally importantly, it takes very little effort for time-poor teachers and resource strapped schools to get it set up. edmodo is remotely hosted (so you don't need extra equipment, software or tech support staff to run it), it is free of charge, the user interface is friendly and quick to learn. The low barrier-to-entry means edmodo will actually get used by students and teachers, at very low risk of wasting school time or money.

Why don't we use <insert favorite blog service> instead?

Go for it - no reason not to use both. edmodo and blogs are different and complementary tools: edmodo is more about communicating with your class and managing basic class activities, while in the school environment, blog are usually more about communicating with an external audience and showcasing work. An interesting take on this difference is to consider edmodo as a process tool - where the class discusses and develops ideas, and to view the class blog as a product delivery tool to show class work to the public. Bianca Hewes explores this idea further in her post Moving freely between learning spaces

Why don't we use moodle instead?

edmodo and moodle are different types of tools. If you require a fully implemented course management system (CMS), you should consider using moodle or some similar tool. edmodo will not manage a course for you - it is an online communication and resource sharing tool for you and your class. If you already have moodle at your school and the technical support resources to run it in place, it makes sense to use what you have. However if you have a school still starting out on the e-learning or online journey - edmodo is an ideal starting place for a low-risk, low-cost entry point. With edmodo, you will be up and running in half-an-hour. moodle will take significantly longer - even if you have access to a web-based delivery service.

For more details about moodle, visit the moodle.org site. If you want to see what an actual CMS looks like, try the moodle demo site. To try out edmodo - just create an edmodo account and set up a dummy class group.

A longer discussion is on the Selling edmodo page.

Is edmodo safe for school use?

edmodo was designed right from the start to meet the specific needs of teachers, with security and safety a priority. When students first see edmodo, they usually say "that's like Facebook!" - and they are right in that it's a social application - but when it comes to security, privacy and control, nothing could be less like Facebook!

The most important aspects of the edmodo security model are:
  • edmodo class groups are created and managed by the teacher
  • students need to know the class group code in order to view or participate in the class group
  • teachers have full administrative rights on student participation in the teacher's class group
  • private conversation between students are not possible : students may only communicate to the whole class or the teacher. This reduces opportunities for cyber-bullying
  • teachers may choose to receive automatic notification of student postings into the class group
  • a 'read-only' mode which can be applied selectively for those students who are not using edmodo constructively

If the school sets up an edmodo subdomain:
  • teacher accounts are verified by the school edmodo administrator - this prevents students masquerading as teachers
  • teacher activities on edmodo may be monitored and audited by the school edmodo administrator

For more discussion on edmodo and school safety issues, see the Edmodo and School Safety article.

How much does it cost?

edmodo is currently a free service. The edmodo founders have stated they wish to maintain all current services as free services. Presumably they will offer more services at a later time in order to generate revenue.

Won't the students go crazy with it?

Experience shows that in most cases, once students get over the initial excitement, they use edmodo constructively. It's important to set the ground rules and expectations at the start.

What will parents think?


Won't this increase the workload for teachers? Students will expect us to be online 24 hours?

edmodo provides opportunities to reduce workload as well as to increase it. edmodo offers the chance to share, store and reuse digital resources, and for students to take increased responsibility for learning. Teachers can and should establish student expectations for out-of-school service through edmodo - the teacher may decide not to! Students can also be encouraged to help each other though edmodo.

This isn't fair to students who don't have computers at home connected to the internet!

True. So care is needed - teachers can check with their class and decide the level of edmodo use. But even students with a computer connected to the internet might have computer or connection problems at times - so it makes sense to provide alternatives for assessments and essential class information.